Monday, April 21, 2008

An opening you could drive a satellite truck through

As a college newspaper editor in the early 1970s, I had a conversation with an aged Baltimore Sun reporter (he must have been at least 50) about the future of our business. We agreed that television would surely bury us; it was just a matter of time. But I was in love with newspapers and determined to press on.

"I don't understand you, kid" he said. "Me, I'm just obsolete. You're an anachronism."

Well, tomorrow night, on the occasion of a pivotal election contest in the most interesting presidential primary campaign of my life, network television will desert the field – and newspapers will still be there. As the Miami Herald is reporting here, there's no network coverage scheduled for the Pennsylvania primary.

This leaves the field wide open to cable, of course – and also to us. Instantaneous online reporting, live-blogging and database capabilities provide ample opportunity for us to display the greater depth and sophistication of our political coverage. As live and streaming video become more available, that opportunity only grows.


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